FactsCorner

20 Weird Facts About Japan.



The country is known for it's idiosyncratic culture and pastimes. These weird facts are very weird.

'Naked Festival'.

'Naked Festival'.

To top the list we have the most unusual fact about Japan. A Hakada Matsuri, or "naked festival," is exactly what it sounds like.

Lot of places in Japan, thousands of men and boys strip down to loincloths in hope of gaining luck for the year.

Eww...!

Ever Heard Of Coffee Spa?

Ever Heard Of Coffee Spa?

There's a centuries-old tradition in Japan, of traditional bathhouses.

But this special place called, the Yunessun Spa Resort is different from any other traditional spa there you can soak in a green tea spa, a sake spa, a coffee spa, and even a ramen-noodle spa.

Cuddle Cafes

Cuddle Cafes

Yes, you read right! Renting a cuddle is a real thing in Japan.

The first “cuddle cafes” opened in Tokyo in 2014, called Soine-ya which literally translates to "sleep-together shop", they allow male customers to sleep next to a woman for a fee.

Sexual requests are not allowed, but the menu includes "staring at each other for a minute" or "stroking the girl's hair for three minutes" for 1,000 yen each.

Looking for lust-free comfort? Soine-ya is the place for you!

Tan Tactics.

Tan Tactics.

This practice is known as, Ganguro, which literally translates to "blackface," is a recent trend in which women bleach their hair and wear facial makeup that is close to an exaggerated tan.

It defies what actual makeup means. This makeup doesn’t have the same meaning that it does in North American culture instead, it’s a reaction to traditional beauty standards that require dark hair, pale skin, and understated makeup.

Weird teeth.

Weird teeth.

This is one of the weirdest fashion trend, yaeba, in which young Japanese women have artificially uneven teeth installed to imitate a naturally snaggle-toothed smile.

Father figure.

Father figure.

In Japan, adults are more commonly adopted than children. In 2011, 90% of the people were men between the ages of 20 and 30.

These adoptions are often a way for a family to secure a heir or pass down a business.

Cleaning With Class.

Cleaning With Class.

You might have seen Nobita cleaning the class with his friends after school in the Japanese cartoon show, Doraemon.

Japanese students clean their schools as part of their school day in a tradition called o-soji. Time is set aside every day for students to tidy up classrooms, mop floors, and clean bathrooms.

This tradition teaches students to help others and respect their surroundings.

Final forest.

 Final forest.

The world's second most popular place to commit suicide, after the Golden Gate Bridge.
Is in the shadows of Mt. Fuji, the Aokigahara forest.

Over 70 bodies are found in the woods every year, but it’s believed that many bodies are lost in the forest. The location’s popularity was revived by the novel Kuroai Jukai, which ends with a romanticized joint suicide.

The suicide destination is very popular because of which the Japanese authorities have stopped reporting actual death counts.

On track.

On track.

The most heavily travelled high speed rail line in the world, Tōkaidō Shinkansen, average delay is about half a minute.

Trains are expected to be so punctual that if a train is five minutes late, the railway company might issue official delay certificates, to provide proof for employers and appointments.

If a train is delayed for an hour or more, it'll take the newspaper.

Pet paternity.

Pet paternity.

Japan has an estimated 22 million pets, but only 16.6 million children under the age of 15. The country has more pets than children.

Char-Hazard.

Char-Hazard.

We are all familiar with the anime series, Pokémon. An episode aired on December 16, 1997, caused 685 Japanese children land in hospital due to head headaches, dizziness, nausea, and even seizures caused by the show’s repetitive visual effects.

It was then labelled as, the “Pokémon Shock,” the show went into a four-month suspension, and the episode was not broadcast worldwide.

The irony is that some viewers also had seizures when the offending scenes were shown on news reports about the incident.

Unnamed Streets.

Unnamed Streets.

Most of the Japanese streets are unnamed. The process used for postal addresses is complex and idiosyncratic.

It starts with the prefecture (kind of like a state), then the city or municipality, the district, and then the block (for urban addresses) or the land number (in rural locations). To give directions to a location, most people give landmarks and subway stations.

Business cards include maps on them.

Shifted Axis.

Shifted Axis.

Did you notice that the time has been moving faster?

The 2011 earthquake near Japan shifted the earth’s axis by 10 to 25 centimeters, increasing the rotation speed of the earth which shortened the day by 1.8 microseconds.

Village of Dolls.

Village of Dolls.

The village of Nagoro in Japan has more human-size dolls than human residents.

Tsukimi Ayano, a local artist creates the dolls in the memory of former locals as they die or move away.

Ayano places the dolls in various states of action around the village. There are more than 350 dolls, but only around 40 real-life residents.

Chocolate or not?

Chocolate or not?

In Japan there is a game show where one item in a room is replaced with a look-alike item made of chocolate or other candy, and the participants are given instructions to try to find it. By biting into various objects.

Sacred Rule, God Surrenders.

Sacred Rule, God Surrenders.

This Japanese tradition, Shinto, the Japanese emperor is considered 'Godly', and his voice is that of a god.

The first time that the Japanese people heard their emperor’s voice was when he announced the country’s surrender in World War II on the radio.

Yes you can!

Yes you can!

A chain of restaurants, in Japan, called Mr. Kanso only serves can-food. There are more than 40 locations nationwide, diners can choose from more than 300 dishes, from cuisines from around the world.

Also, if you tip waitstaff in Japan, you are considered rude.

Sorry

Sorry

Japan is a very gratuitous because of which there are more than 20 ways to apologize in Japanese.

Magical stick.

Magical stick.

Japanese food scientists have recently invented ice-cream bars that do not melt.

They were actually experimenting with the chemistry of strawberries to help farmers affected by the 2011 tsunami, but accidentally discovered a chemical that solidifies cream almost instantly.

Sushi.

Sushi.

Japan is the land of sushi but one of the most popular kinds of sushi isn’t Japanese in origin.

A Norwegian diplomat introduced salmon sushi to the Japanese in the 80's to sell his country's own fish. The Japanese didn’t eat salmon raw—it was usually grilled or dried. Even then, salmon sushi didn’t really catch on until the mid-90's.

Sushi-chain owner Kiyoshi Kimura, known as Japan’s Tuna King, recently paid $600,000 for a 467 lb Bluefin tuna at the famous Tsukiji fish auction. Based on the auction price, a single piece of sushi from this fish would cost about $85. This was not Kimura’s most expensive fish, though—the distinction goes to the $1.8 million fish he bought in 2013.



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